Monday, December 12, 2011

The Pony in the Dung Heap Joke

Is the glass half empty or half full? The pess...
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I recently came across a humorous, yet insightful, joke. You may have heard it before. It's the pony in the dung heap. Last week I read it for the first time within, "How Ronald Reagan Changed My Life", by Peter Robinson. Here's an exert from the book containing the joke:

-----BEGIN EXERT------

Chapter One 
The Pony In the Dung Heap 
When Life Buries You, Dig 
Journal Entry, June 2002:


Over lunch today I asked Ed Meese about one of Reagan's favorite jokes. "The pony joke?" Meese replied. "Sure I remember it. If I heard him tell it once, I heard him tell it a thousand times."


The joke concerns twin boys of five or six. Worried that the boys had developed extreme personalities -- one was a total pessimist, the other a total optimist -- their parents took them to a psychiatrist.


First the psychiatrist treated the pessimist. Trying to brighten his outlook, the psychiatrist took him to a room piled to the ceiling with brand-new toys. But instead of yelping with delight, the little boy burst into tears. "What's the matter?" the psychiatrist asked, baffled. "Don't you want to play with any of the toys?" "Yes," the little boy bawled, "but if I did I'd only break them."


Next the psychiatrist treated the optimist. Trying to dampen his out look, the psychiatrist took him to a room piled to the ceiling with horse manure. But instead of wrinkling his nose in disgust, the optimist emitted just the yelp of delight the psychiatrist had been hoping to hear from his brother, the pessimist. Then he clambered to the top of the pile, dropped to his knees, and began gleefully digging out scoop after scoop with his bare hands. "What do you think you're doing?" the psychiatrist asked, just as baffled by the optimist as he had been by the pessimist. "With all this manure," the little boy replied, beaming, "there must be a pony in here somewhere!"


"Reagan told the joke so often," Meese said, chuckling, "that it got to be kind of a joke with the rest of us. Whenever something would go wrong, somebody on the staff would be sure to say, "There must be a pony in here somewhere.'"

-----END EXERT------

It's a great joke to tell ourselves when we're feeling buried under heaps of work and life responsibilities as a reminder to persevere and make the best out of any given moment. For me, it'll take a lifetime to fully grasp, and even then, I might not have made it an automatic process and I'll still see "the glass half empty" at times.


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